What We Believe
 
 
 
 
 
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WHAT WE BELIEVE
PAUL MARZAHN
 
CROSSROADS CHURCH is United Methodist
 
To understand CROSSROADS theology and history fully, one must have some understanding of the denomination. CROSSROADS is a church that emphasizes that all Christians are one in God’s sight. We stress our common beliefs, rather than our differences in Christ. Yet, we have a distinct heritage that draws us toward other churches with a similar background. This section is designed to enlighten you regarding this heritage. What is a United Methodist? In the words of John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist movement, he states: “A Methodist is … one who loves the Lord, his God with his heart, soul, mind and strength.”
 
 
THE HOLY TRINITY
We believe in God, Creator of the World; and in Jesus Christ the redeemer of creation. We believe in the Holy Spirit, through whom we acknowledge God’s gifts, and we repent of our sin in misusing these gifts to idolatrous ends.
GOD CREATED THE WORLD
We affirm the natural world as God’s handiwork and dedicate ourselves to its preservation, enhancement, and faithful use by humankind.
 
The Sacraments of the church
 
BAPTISM
For United Methodists, baptism is the sacrament of initiation that joins us with the Church and Christians everywhere. It’s a symbol of new life and a promise of God’s saving love. Both infants and adults can be baptized. When infants are baptized we encourage a process called confirmation where baptized youth can learn how to develop their faith relationship with Jesus Christ. United Methodists baptize by sprinkling, immersion or pouring.
 
COMMUNION
The Lord’s Supper is a holy meal of bread and wine that symbolizes the body and blood of Christ. By sharing this meal, United Methodists give thanks to Jesus’ sacrifice for our sins. The Lord’s Supper recalls the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus and celebrates the unity of all the members of God’s family. (Mark 14:22-24) United Methodists, because of our tradition of abstinence from alcohol, use grape juice rather than wine in communion. We celebrate communion by intinction (bread dipped into a cup) or by passing individual cups.